Wembley Stadium

                     a modern day colosseum of sports

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Client Profile:

As the city of London captured the right to host the 2012 Summer Olympics there was no better center-stage for this epic event to unfold than the Wembley Stadium.

The Wembley Stadium has a long and a rich history, dating back to 1923 when it first opened. Its old name was the Empire Stadium and it was also referred to as the Twin Towers before being demolished in 2003. The legend was re-born a few short years after, when in 2007 the new stadium opened its doors with a maximum capacity of 90,000 spectators, making it the second-largest stadium in Europe, after Camp Nou located in Barcelona.

Wembley Stadium is a world-known football stage, as a home to England's national football team, in addition to playing host to a number of other sporting and cultural events that regularly bring tens of thousands of people into this magnificent structure.

 

Case Introduction:

During the construction in preparation for its planed re-opening in 2007, it was necessary to develop a carefully-designed navigation system to direct and to control the incoming traffic of people and transportation, in addition to making it both safe and easy to understand. As with any other such structure of monumental proportions and huge seating capacity (dating back to the Roman Colosseum), this was no easy task.

 

Project Scope and Goals:

Senteo's Co-Founding Partner Ian Newman was responsible for developing practically from scratch a blueprint of how people would move in and out of the Wembley. This required a careful study of the customer flows, the speed and timing, the modes of transportation, the directions to every possible public and private space in and out of the stadium, the integration of the planned flow with all the building's services and common areas, and a million (if not more) other elements of the building's architectural design that were built to acommodate and entertain a massive audience, and do so in a safe environment that is easy to navigate.

The resulting methodology was successfully applied in a number of other big-ticket venues, such as the Heathrow Airport and the 2012 London Olympics.

 

Results:

The result of the work is not so much about was is visible, but what is not visible. Obviously, thousands of directional signage elements can be seen throughout the stadium and even several miles away from it, whether you are travelling from the airport, the Tube, or in cab through the streets of London. However, most importantly, the result of the work done in this project is manifested through the efficiency with which the stadium is able to fill itself up to almost bursting capacity and then once again empty, leaving nothing but a hollow sound of an echo. The booming noise of the stadium during a major football match dissipates with the crowds as they exit the Wembley, inspiring memories of the event they have just witnessed. In fact, that is exactly the message that the Wembley Stadium carries in its brand – inspiring memories – an ultimate testament to a thoroughly positive customer experience.

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